tormented-spirituality:

-David Michael Stoupakis

tormented-spirituality:

-David Michael Stoupakis

16 Apr 14 @ 3:27 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog
theduplicitytimes:

6 WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK
Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.
"If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story."

theduplicitytimes:

6 WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK

  1. Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
  2. Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
  3. Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
  4. If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
  5. Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
  6. If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.

"If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story."

16 Apr 14 @ 10:39 am  —  via + org  —  reblog

steampunktendencies:

The Study Set from the Haunted Mansion.

16 Apr 14 @ 12:22 am  —  via + org  —  reblog

The first innovative bicycle path in the Netherlands will be paved with light stones that will charge during the day and emit light during the evening. The path will run by the home that Vincent van Gogh lived in from 1883-5.

The first innovative bicycle path in the Netherlands will be paved with light stones that will charge during the day and emit light during the evening. The path will run by the home that Vincent van Gogh lived in from 1883-5.

16 Apr 14 @ 12:18 am  —  via + org  —  reblog
❝ The taste of death is upon my lips. I feel something that is not of this earth.
— Mozart   (via sataniel)
15 Apr 14 @ 11:01 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog
15 Apr 14 @ 9:49 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog

Blood moon tonight

15 Apr 14 @ 12:51 am  —  reblog
14 Apr 14 @ 12:50 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog
Preparing her for Punishment

obey-sir:

A punishment spanking is often more filled with ritual than most any other scene and draws very much on her anticipation of an event that she knows will be a test and challenge to her.

Sending to her room to await you should excite her greatly even though she knows the spanking may not be that enjoyable. Making *her* fetch the implement used in her correction is an added erotic embarrassment. You may want to have her strip in advance and go to the corner to reflect upon her infraction and what steps she is going to take in the future to avoid a similar lapse. Or, you may want to have her place herself face down on the bed with a pillow under her hips and paddle beside her. If you want to see just how exciting the anticipation of a punishment can be, have her wait at least 10 minutes before you come into the room and then check her for wetness.

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14 Apr 14 @ 12:48 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog
12 Apr 14 @ 11:02 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog
12 Apr 14 @ 10:43 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog

Natchez - 10 yr old Florence died in 1871. She was extremely frightened of storms and her grief-stricken mother had Florence’s casket constructed with a glass window at the head. The grave was dug to provide an area, the same depth of the coffin, at the child’s head, but this area had steps that would allow the mother to descend to her daughter’s level so she could comfort her during storms. To shelter the mother, metal trap doors were installed over the area the mother would occupy.

Natchez - 10 yr old Florence died in 1871. She was extremely frightened of storms and her grief-stricken mother had Florence’s casket constructed with a glass window at the head. The grave was dug to provide an area, the same depth of the coffin, at the child’s head, but this area had steps that would allow the mother to descend to her daughter’s level so she could comfort her during storms. To shelter the mother, metal trap doors were installed over the area the mother would occupy.

12 Apr 14 @ 10:40 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog
mortisia:

— Susanna Kaysen, Girl, Interrupted 

mortisia:

Susanna Kaysen, Girl, Interrupted 

12 Apr 14 @ 3:19 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog
12 Apr 14 @ 7:13 am  —  via + org  —  reblog
11 Apr 14 @ 10:42 pm  —  via + org  —  reblog